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In the Course of Art, Love and Scandal

February 28th, 2011, The Wall Street Journal

At Indochine Thursday, Vladimir Restoin Roitfeld and Andy Valmorbida hosted an after-party for the opening of “The Hallelujah World Tour,” an art exhibit by the Los Angeles graffiti-turned-studio artist Retna, whose work, once seen only on the street, was selling for upward of $30,000.

“I’m going to be a street-hold name,” said the painter.

Olivier Zahm, the 47-year-old editor of Purple magazine, was there too, already anxious about Valentine’s Day. “I’m working on the comeback of my girlfriend,” he explained. “She left me last summer. This is a big problem.”

Even for the international art set, the 14th, apparently, inspires some anxiety. Mr. Restoin Roitfeld said he wouldn’t be spending the day with his girlfriend of two years, Giovanna Battaglia, an editor at Italian Vogue. “Her grandmother is very sick at the moment so she has to stay with her family,” he said

His mother, Carine Roitfeld, shook her hair back and forth to “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun” and said she’s been “very busy,” since resigning from French Vogue. Her son added that the resignation hasn’t yielded more mother-son time: “My mom is probably busier now than she was before.”

Meanwhile, Stefano Tonchi, the editor of W, set the record straight about a recent mini scandal with Kim Kardashian, who graced the cover of the magazine in November. On her reality show, “Kourtney & Kim Take New York,” she claimed she was told she wouldn’t be nude in the magazine, calling the images that ran “pornographic.” The scene prompted a “Saturday Night Live” spoof.

“She always knew what she was doing,” Mr. Tonchi said. “I think she maybe would like to rewrite history. It’s only great news for our website. I think we got seven million readers from her saying that.”

—Mike Vilensky

Source: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703786804576138521995160228.html

Hallelujah! Graffiti artist Retna goes Global

February 21st, 2011, Redbull

Retna, the 31-year-old artist from Los Angeles, opened his first New York solo exhibition last week, and I got to see what it’s like to be an artist at the peak of his powers.

Retna, whose real name is Marquis Lewis, comes from a graffiti background. The nom de plume – derived from a Raekwon song – was originally given to a friend. “I gave him a sketch, and he went and battled some dude and he lost,” Retna said previously in an interview with Upper Playground. “He wasn’t even supposed to battle anyone anyway with my sketch that I gave him. And on top of that he lost, so that really pissed me off, so I took the name back.”

Over the past few years, Retna has been known less for his graffiti pieces than a unique written language derived from various ancient scripts.

“It draws on Egyptian hieroglyphics, and Mayan glyphs, as well as Mexican and pre-Columbian heritage,” Jeffrey Deitch, director of MoCA in Los Angeles, said. “He filters those traditions through the tradition of tagging and graffiti that has been seen in Los Angeles since the 1970s. Within these traditions, he has come up with something entirely his own.”

The New York exhibition, majestically titled The Hallelujah World Tour (Venice and London are the two other stops) is Retna’s biggest show to date.

Inside a big pop-up space one block away from the West Side Highway, 35 large paintings – almost exclusively black, white and silver – covered virtually every inch of wall space. An installation of block letters, spelling Retna’s name occupied the centre of the gallery. There was a line of waiters in black holding glasses of white wine on silver trays. A team of publicists pulled the show’s two organisers, Andy Valmorbida and Vladimir Restoin Roitfeld, through the gathering crowd for interviews and photo ops.

“It’s a million-dollar show,” said Valmorbida, who owns an eponymous gallery in Manhattan. He was wearing a white shirt (untucked), black tie and black jeans. Restoin-Roitfeld, sporting a dark suit with a finely sculpted scarf situation, stood next to him, surveying the crowded gallery.

The two profess to be star makers to mid-career artists. “We set up a package for the artist, with gallery and exhibitions and publicity,” Valmorbida said. “We look at thousands of artists and pick one.”

In 2008, they plucked Richard Hambleton, a street artist and contemporary of Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat, out of relative obscurity and promoted him as the forgotten connection to that golden age of graffiti. They set up star-studded shows for Hambleton in New York, London, Moscow, Milan and Cannes. The show in New York is sold out.

Valmorbida and Restoin-Roitfeld have the same plans for Retna, who sold almost all his paintings (at prices upward of $25,000) before the night was over. “He has what it takes to make it big,” Valmorbida said.

“The Hallelujah World Tour” is on view at 560 Washington St., New York, NY, through until February 21.

SOURCE: http://www.redbull.com/cs/Satellite/en_INT/Article/Hallelujah–Graffiti-artist-Retna-goes-Global-021242963695402

The Q&A: Retna, artist

February 21st, 2011, The Economist

AT FIRST glance, the work of the artist Retna looks like an undiscovered ancient script: a series of hypnotic symbols—complex, beautiful and captivating. But Retna has created an original alphabet, fusing together influences from ancient Incan and Egyptian hieroglyphics, Arabic, Hebrew, Asian calligraphy, and graffiti. Each piece carries meaning, conveying an event or dialogue that the artist experienced.

As a youth of African-American, El Salvadorian and Cherokee descent growing up in Los Angeles, Retna (real name Marquis Lewis) was mesmerized by the gang graffiti that surrounded him. He began practicing the art form, and adopted the name Retna from a Wu-Tang Clan song. In the mid-nineties he began making murals on walls, trains and freeway overpasses throughout the city.

Retna has transformed from a street artist to a break-out star in the contemporary art world. He has garnered attention from Usher, an R&B artist, who commissioned the artist to create a portrait of Marvin Gaye, and MOCA director Jeffrey Deitch, who wrote in the September 2010 issue of Juxtapoz “one of the most exciting exhibitions…this year, anywhere, was Retna’s exhibition at New Image Art.” This spring, MOCA will feature Retna’s work in the “Art in the Streets” exhibit.

On February 10th, Retna opened his first solo show in New York, “The Hallelujah World Tour”, presented by Andy Valmorbida and Vladimir Restoin-Roitfeld, in conjunction with New York City’s Fashion Week. The tour will continue with exhibitions in London and Venice. Retna spoke with More Intelligent Life about his script, growing up in L.A. and graffiti.

How did growing up in Los Angeles affect your work?

The people that I met, the neighborhood guys, the fascination with graffiti and things that weren’t always seen as a good thing. It was illegal for the most part, what it was that we were doing. It’s influenced in my work. Everything represents a very strong L.A. influence.

Were you ever in a gang?

I think I had asked to join the neighborhood guys, and they were like ‘Marquis there’s nothing here for you, you can come hang out with us, we’ll let you paint on our walls but you don’t have to be a part of us’. And I owe them a lot for that for letting me pursue my own dream.

Do you still write on the streets?

I haven’t been as active as I want to be. I’ve done murals, but I haven’t been active in that area. It’s been a while, maybe like two years, but I’ve been really busy.

How and when did you decide to take traditional gang graffiti and turn it into your own script?

I was influenced by Old English since I was eight or nine-years-old. It was very popular amongst street gangs and they were writing Old English, which was really taken more from the LA Times and the New York Times and I just really enjoyed the way the letters were formed. They just had such an elegance to them. Then I went into a phase where I was just writing in the traditional graffiti style and I believe somewhere in 1997 or 1998 I started combining the two, where the Old English style, the graffiti style and I was very highly influenced by Asian calligraphy. I was really fascinated with ancient cultures and writing, and then became interested in Hebrew and Arabic writing after September 11th because they became more prevalent in the news and started to find their way within my work. I’m not copying any of those letters, but I think the influences are from that.

How did your art go from the streets to the more highbrow establishments that they’re in now?

These artists Chaz and Mear were curating a show in L.A. and they invited me to be a part of it. That was the first show I had every done. That was in 1997 I want to say.

And after that I think I kind of got the bug and I thought that it would be fun to do this. It was a way of being a legitimate artist but I also felt like I could make my mom proud, I could do it the right way. You gotta love where you came from too because if I hadn’t come from the street or been a graffiti writer, I wouldn’t be where I am now. And there might be guys who don’t like people like us, [because we are]  inside the galleries, they go, “oh, it’s not real”. I don’t really care. I know who I am and what I’ve done and there’s people from that movement that just love seeing it inside places, and they’re happy because they do it too.

I wouldn’t be where I’m at if it wasn’t for all the graffiti artists and writers that came before me. And this is my way of saying thank you.

Where did you come across the various writings (Arabic, Hebrew, Hieroglyphics, etc.) that inspire your script?

Just books, looking at stuff, researching. Obviously I can’t read any of that stuff—I just liked it. I’d look at it or want to study about it or learn more about it. I gravitated towards that because that’s what I’ve been doing—I’ve been writing and I wanted to make this text that was influenced by the world and I wanted everyone to be able to relate to it. I was mixed [race], so I never really felt like I fit in, or I was either one or this or that, so I just started to say I was down with everybody and I wanted my work to reflect that. That

How and when did you decide to take traditional gang graffiti and turn it into your own script?

I was influenced by Old English since I was eight or nine-years-old. It was very popular amongst street gangs and they were writing Old English, which was really taken more from the LA Times and the New York Times and I just really enjoyed the way the letters were formed. They just had such an elegance to them. Then I went into a phase where I was just writing in the traditional graffiti style and I believe somewhere in 1997 or 1998 I started combining the two, where the Old English style, the graffiti style and I was very highly influenced by Asian calligraphy. I was really fascinated with ancient cultures and writing, and then became interested in Hebrew and Arabic writing after September 11th because they became more prevalent in the news and started to find their way within my work. I’m not copying any of those letters, but I think the influences are from that.

How did your art go from the streets to the more highbrow establishments that they’re in now?

These artists Chaz and Mear were curating a show in L.A. and they invited me to be a part of it. That was the first show I had every done. That was in 1997 I want to say.

And after that I think I kind of got the bug and I thought that it would be fun to do this. It was a way of being a legitimate artist but I also felt like I could make my mom proud, I could do it the right way. You gotta love where you came from too because if I hadn’t come from the street or been a graffiti writer, I wouldn’t be where I am now. And there might be guys who don’t like people like us, [because we are]  inside the galleries, they go, “oh, it’s not real”. I don’t really care. I know who I am and what I’ve done and there’s people from that movement that just love seeing it inside places, and they’re happy because they do it too.

I wouldn’t be where I’m at if it wasn’t for all the graffiti artists and writers that came before me. And this is my way of saying thank you.

Where did you come across the various writings (Arabic, Hebrew, Hieroglyphics, etc.) that inspire your script?

Just books, looking at stuff, researching. Obviously I can’t read any of that stuff—I just liked it. I’d look at it or want to study about it or learn more about it. I gravitated towards that because that’s what I’ve been doing—I’ve been writing and I wanted to make this text that was influenced by the world and I wanted everyone to be able to relate to it. I was mixed [race], so I never really felt like I fit in, or I was either one or this or that, so I just started to say I was down with everybody and I wanted my work to reflect that. That was the idea I was after.

Is there a verbal element to it, or is it just visual?

There’s a verbal element. It could be a poem, it could be just stuff that I’m thinking about, for me it’s just a very meditative process; I’m just having a conversation with myself. Sometimes I allow the music to influence what I’m writing. A lot of them are names my mom would call me when I was growing up, and some are things I’m talking about, friends who have passed away—they’re interactions with what’s going on with people that I just meet, or a conversation I just had. I hear a word or a phrase or a dialogue, and then that becomes my response. They all say something.

Would you ever make a translation?

I’ve been asked. I want people to try and figure it out. I think I give them what it says, but I like the interaction part. That reminds me of when I’m looking at like Hebrew or calligraphy, or anything like that—I don’t know what it says. But if I try to do my homework, or look into it, I’ll find a meaning and try to find why it’s like that, or maybe I won’t, but at least you give it that attempt of trying to see it.

That’s really interesting to me. It makes more sense now, because as someone observing your art, how do I know it’s not just a bunch of nonsensical symbols?

Right, no definitely. I think once people are more familiar with my work, they can understand it. The more you familiarize yourself with, you start to see, ‘okay there’s the ‘S’, there’s an ‘E’, there’s a ‘V’. I’ve ran into a couple of people that are really able to read the stuff, and it always surprises me.

What artists inspire you?

I love art nouveau, Alphonse Mucha, Gustav Klimt, Monet, Basquiat, Haring. There’s a whole list of graffiti artists—Lee Quinones, Chaz Bojorquez. I love Degas’s ballerinas. I have a pretty wide range of art that I like. There’s this artist here in New York I believe he just had a show—Folkert de Jong. Oh my God, his work is beautiful. And I love sculpture, I love architecture, I love ancient buildings, Masonic buildings, cathedrals, churches, synagogues, mosques—I just love the way they look they just have a really elegant kind of thing to them. I love Asian temples. I like a lot of cultures and things.

Do you think there’s a difference between street art and graffiti?

To me it’s interesting because a lot of street artist people, they call themselves graffiti writers. They’re two different things. A graffiti writer is someone that writes their name on the wall, but they’ve blurred the lines. But, I think it’s a great movement. I’m glad to be associated with it. There are a lot of great artists in that in that, and there are a lot of people that aren’t so good—that’s like anything. There are guys who are really talented at graffiti and there are guys whose stuff you just don’t like, but that’s the nature of it. I can’t say anything bad about them. Without the people who have become popular with street art, I probably wouldn’t be here now. I’d like to think I would have got to my goal anyway, but I’m sure I owe them some kind of gratitude and I’m alright with that.

The Hallelujah World Tour” is at 560 Washington Street in New York through Feb. 21st.

 

 

SoHo Gallery? Black, of Course.

February 18th, 2011, The New York Times

Vladimir Restoin Roitfeld, 26, is an art dealer and curator. His most recent endeavor, with his partner, Andy Valmorbida, is the recently opened exhibition of the Los Angeles-based street artist Retna at a gallery space in SoHo. Mr. Restoin Roitfeld, born and raised in Paris, is surrounded by a holy trinity of fashion-savvy women: his mother, the recently departed French Vogue editor Carine Roitfeld; his girlfriend, the L’Uomo Vogue fashion editor Giovanna Battaglia; and his sister, Julia Restoin Roitfeld, an art director and a model. CHLOE MALLE

FRIDAY, FEB. 4

Andy and I started installation on the show very early this morning. It was freezing cold outside the space so I wore gray wool pants from Alexander McQueen, my winter coat by Margiela, a long thermal T-shirt, a vintage black sweater, black scarf, black hat, black gloves and Visvim sneakers. We installed in the space for about three hours, then the three of us went to the George Condo exhibition at the New Museum. On our way to lunch, we found 20 dump-bound wooden palettes curbside on Bowery outside the Chinese hardware store, which Retna needed for the exhibition and hadn’t been able to find. The gloves came in handy.

SATURDAY, FEB. 5

I wore black Dior jeans, warm black leather boots by Hogan, a black long-sleeve thermal T-shirt, a black cashmere sweater from Marc Jacobs, a black cashmere beanie, and my black Margiela winter coat. My dad and I bought the same coat in Paris and I wear it every day.

After setting up the show all morning, we set out to Fort Greene in the afternoon, where I had a meeting with the painter José Parlá at his studio. We saw some of the works in progress for the new show, which look amazing. I got a bit over-excited and bumped into a table where there was some wet paint lying about, and it splattered all over my jeans. Just part of the job!

SUNDAY, FEB. 6

I woke up at 6 a.m. today and went directly to the gallery to get a heads-up on what had to be done before the rest of the team got there. Then, I jetted uptown at 11 a.m. for the shoot for this article. I wore my black Dior by Hedi Slimane jeans. They are my favorites. I started buying them when I was 20. They’re the best fit for me. I also wore my brown boots by Tom Ford, which were a birthday gift from my girlfriend; a black Armani jacket; and an American Apparel long-sleeve T-shirt. Any city I travel to, I always get some more American Apparel shirts, as I wear them almost every day.

MONDAY, FEB. 7

Andy and I spent the whole day, from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., at the gallery with Retna and his team. I sported my usual work uniform: Dior jeans, brown Hogan boots (I think they are the ones designed by Dennis Hopper, limited edition — they are really biker boots), black long-sleeve American Apparel T-shirt, black cashmere sweater, black Margiela coat with a black Chrome Hearts beanie.

TUESDAY, FEB. 8

I got in my black Dior jeans, brown biker boots, thermal long-sleeve T-shirt, black cashmere sweater, black cashmere scarf, Chrome Hearts beanie and winter coat — and I was still freezing. I stopped at the dry-cleaner and dropped off my two suits to be cleaned for the amfAR benefit and the exhibition opening. There was soooo much wind in the street, I could barely move forward. I met up with Andy at the space. Everything was really taking shape and everyone was in a good mood.

Around 6 p.m., I headed back home. I got into my RVCA gear and had an hourlong kickboxing session. Afterward, I went to dinner with my parents, sister and a few close friends. I switched into a black Armani jacket and white T-shirt.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 9

I woke up sick today, with a fever and sinus infection. I got into my usual gear but added some gloves and a big pashmina scarf that I bought in India a couple of years ago. You can wrap it up around your face.

I went to the space with Andy as we had so much work to finish and clients coming down. All was going really well, but I had to see a doctor. So I went back uptown and saw one at my parents’ hotel. They told me I needed a couple of days of bed rest. Not good timing. I still made it to the amfAR benefit at Cipriani Wall Street. I wore a black Armani tuxedo. The best one I have.

THURSDAY, FEB. 10

I stayed home all day today — in bed, sick with fever. For the opening and after-party of the exhibition I wore my Armani black jacket, black shirt, Hermès scarf, some black jeans and black vintage boots. I took vitamin C all day and probiotics before heading out.

SOURCE: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/20/fashion/20WHATIWORE.html

African American Heritage Poster Award Ceremony at the new LAPD building.

Photos by Eriberto Oriol, ForbiddenArtLa.com

Recap: RETNA “The Hallelujah World Tour” Exhibition NY

February 14th, 2011, Jungle Gym Magazine

“The Hallelujah World Tour”‘. As anticipated last weekend RETNA has inaugurated the first stage of his exhibition ‘The Hallelujah World Tour’. Here’s a look at the inaugural event in NYC. Truly remarkable how many new works, including paintings and installations, 3D, created by the artist and exposed to California specifically for this project. After the New York “The Hallelujah World Tour” will touch London and Hong Kong.

SOURCE: http://junglegymmagazine.com/2011/02/14/recap-hallelujahworld-our/

Behind gate 37E on Washington Street lies a warehouse with a Buick Regal parked inside. Photographers are snapping away, laptops are out, and well-dressed critics buzz throughout the space. This was the scene when I visited “Breaking Bread,” the first stop on Retna’s three-continent-spanning Hallelujah Tour on the day before its opening.

Sponsored by VistaJet and Bombardier, the tour will see the L.A. graffiti legend spend the better part of the next year on the road, painting all original material in NYC, Hong Kong and London—and with a just-announced surprise show in Venice along the way. The series of shows comes on the heels of Retna’s successful solo show at L.A.’s New Image Art gallery, where powerhouse Museum of Contemporary Art director Jeffery Deitch compared Retna to Keith Haring, positioning it as “one of the most exciting exhibitions that I have seen this year.”

For someone arguably at the peak of his career, Retna speaks casually about the worldwide tour, describing how the origins of the show started with a studio visit from the concept’s impresarios Andy Valmorbida and Vlad Restoin Roitfeld. “I thought it was cool, I was down with the cities. Then the sponsors came in and they wanted to put the ad on the plane digitally. I was like, ‘Nah, if my work’s gonna be out there it’s gonna be real, I don’t photoshop shit. If you want my work on that plane it’s going to be one 100% real.’ So now they’re locking down some super hanger so I can paint in it.”

If this newfound big league is unexpected or overwhelming, Retna doesn’t show it. “You know that’s why I still listen to the same music as I did back then. I’m still that same kid trying to get up on walls chasing the dream. When I was young I didn’t know what it was, but now that I’m here I guess this is the dream, I’m living it now.” Just after Retna shares these insights, a scruffy group of men who could be Hell’s Angels approach us. “You really out did yourself this time bro, looks great.”

The man clamps my hand, “Haze, good to meet you. This is my girl Rosie.” As in Perez, and Haze himself is one of graffiti’s inventors. Our corner of the room starts to fill up with members of Retna’s MSK crew, making it feel like a celebration. And there’s a lot to celebrate, not only Retna but the culture he represents—a kid from the gang-infested streets of L.A. who desperately wanted to join a gang at 13 but was told to focus on art instead. “You know they didn’t do that for just anybody,” he recalls. “They told me you can chill with us, you can smoke with us, you can paint our walls, but you ain’t a gangbanger.”

Retna introduces me to Revok1, who was recently arrested in Australia in what was called “the vandal vacation.” Revok1 explains, “Something like 10,000 kids went out to Melbourne from all over the country when they heard what was going down. They painted like 70% of all of the trains. The mayor came out and declared a state of emergency and called it a disgrace.”

Retna asks if we should continue the interview at a bar so he can relax, but before we can decide where, two enthusiastic assistants corner us saying, “This dinner is a huge deal! It’s like $100,000 a plate, and they’re auctioning off your painting. Bill Clinton is going to be there.” Retna, seemingly unaffected, is more interested in rounding up his friends for a quiet night downtown somewhere. After some back and forth with the assistants, it’s decided that his presence is required as an ambassador of “street art” culture. This is his world now whether he likes it or not. “I’m not a street artist dude, I mean, they can’t do what we do. I’m a graf writer. I always have been. Graf writers were getting gallery shows since the ’80s. This isn’t new, they just like that tag because it’s safe.”

With no suit on hand for the black tie event, we begin shopping through Soho, punctuated by “Fear and Loathing” moments, like Retna walking around Hugo Boss shirtless. The manicured men standing at attention find his antics less than amusing, even scoffing at his lack of interest in their style.

With the same courage he showed when he faced jail time and the same unflagging desire to paint, Retna does it all for the culture now so warmly embraced by high society. Before he disappears into the crowds of Soho, he turns with eyes open hugging the sky, “not bad for a lil nigga from the hood!”

Kicking off the Hallelujah Tour, “Breaking Bread” opens 10 February 2011 and runs through 21 February 2011 before moving on to its next port.

SOURCE: http://www.coolhunting.com/culture/retna-halleluja.php

PETA and friends made a more fashion-friendly appearance at Fashion Week in Stella McCartney‘s boutique, with not a drop of paint in sight, while the opening of street artist RETNA’s Hallelujah World Tour rolled out the concrete carpet for an innovative new art installation. Check out all the action from these parties here!

PETA’s Fashion Week Bash

Go HERE for more photos by Natalie Poette, and tag yourself and your friends!

The fur was flying (or, you know, nonexistent) at PETA’s party as the likes of Tim Gunn, Olivia Munn, Stephanie Pratt and Taraji P. Henson showed their support for their furry friends more stylishly than any other animal lovers out there.

Vladimir Roitfeld and Andy Valmorbida presented the first New York solo show of the street artist RETNA for the the first stop on his Hallelujah World Tour. Organized by the curator PM Tenore, the exhibition drew an attendance of over 2000 from the wolds of art and fashion. Check out these pics from the opening, featuring Amanda Hearst, Chris Brown, Brian Atwood, Mark “The Cobrasnake” Hunter, and Olivier Zahm. Don’t miss the installation before it jets off to London and Hong Kong!  After the exhibition, FW VIPs headed to Indochine for cocktails where DJ Nick Cohen spun an amazing set.

SOURCE: http://guestofaguest.com/events/peta-gets-fashion-friendly-retna-makes-his-first-stop-on-hallelujah-world-tour

Openings: Retna – “Hallelujah World Tour” (NYC)

February 14th, 2011, Arrested Motion

Last week, AM attended the much anticipated opening for Retna’s (featured) NYC stop of his Hallelujah World Tour (previewed). Made possible by the folks at Valmorbida, the star studded event was attended by many NYC art, fashion and entertainment notables as it led off the Fashion Week festivities. Like us, those that made it into the jam packed opening were in for a treat as the Los Angeles based artist took his work to another level. Large scale canvases, sculptures and of course the classic detailed works on paper were some of the mediums that comprised this show.

Afterwards, an exclusive afterparty was held at A-list club Indochine. Here the “family” finally took a breather after the weeks of hard work setting up this exhibition. Just wait until the tour hits London & Hong Kong… Oh, did we forget to mention that Retna will be officially “tagging” a leer jet in Austria. Can’t wait to check that out.

More photos after the jump…

SOURCE: http://arrestedmotion.com/2011/02/openings-retna-hallelujah-world-tour-nyc/

RETNA: The Hallelujah World Tour Afterparty at Indochine

February 14th, 2011, Billy Farrell Agency

“RETNA: The Hallelujah World Tour” Afterparty
Location: Indochine, NYC
Photo Credit: Neil Rasmus/BFAnyc.com

See all photos: http://www.billyfarrellagency.com/home/event/688

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